DAVIS SCHNEIDERMAN: INK

By Edward S. Robinson

Ink is a concept novel. It contains exactly what the title promises. It’s perhaps fair to describe it not as a novel as such, as a visual art book. After all, even the most boundary-testing of novels, the likes of which eschew conventions such as linear narrative, plot and characterisation contain words or graphic representations…

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SUPERVERT: POST-DEPRAVITY

By Edward S. Robinson

We live in a post-everything world these days. In fact, we’re so post- many things, we’re probably post-post and are returning full-circle. Post-war… we’re slowly moving toward a different kind of war, not so much defined by the war on terror as the war on everything, a global war that pitches everyone against everything.

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THE POP GROUP: CITIZEN ZOMBIE

By Christopher Nosnibor

The Pop Group’s legacy was an enduring one: the three albums they released between 1977 and 1981 are widely regarded as classic examples of the post punk era. Drawing on elements of myriad genres, spanning jazz and dub, they epitomised avant-gardism in a way that punk acts, and indeed, their peers, simply couldn’t…

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JAMES WILLIAMSON: RE-LICKED

By Christopher Nosnibor

The biographical details have more or less passed into legend now: James Williamson was recruited by The Stooges towards the end of 1970 as a second guitarist, but their seminal 1973 release, Raw Power cemented Williamson’s reputation as an integral member of one of the defining bands of the 20th century.

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BEAU RICE: TEX

By Edward S. Robinson

There is a crisis in the publishing industry, despite the headlines of record-breaking paperback sales and the boon times in digital publishing. People are reading novels, that much is true, but the books they’re reading are far from diverse or numerous, and herein lies the problem – or at least one substantial facet of it.

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IL SOGNO DEL MARINAIO: CANTO SECONDO

By Christopher Nosnibor

It’s so easy to become mired in genres and to stick with what you know, with what you’re confident you’ll like. Broadly speaking, it gets harder with age. Regardless of when they were born, people get locked into the idea that the music of their youth was the best and that anything produced after a certain point…

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SWANS: TO BE KIND

By Christopher Nosnibor

Swans aren’t dead. Not by any stretch. As we all know by now, they’d simply been in hibernation, and all the time Michael Gira was releasing delicate, acoustic-led albums with Angels of light, poison was festering in his veins until Swans were, through artistic necessity, reborn, a magnificent chimera…

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ALCEST: SHELTER

By Stephen Hiscock

Shoegaze, dream-pop, black metal, post metal, blackgaze – too many bloody labels. Instructions for the insecure. Alcest have had all of these pinned onto them at some point. In the end though, it’s whether you’re moved by the music or not – a signpost pointing at it won’t help.

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FOETUS: SOAK / JG THIRLWELL: THE BLUE EYES – ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK

By Christopher Nosnibor

I write unashamedly as a fan first and a critic second when it comes to JG Thirlwell’s work. But it isn’t because I’m blinded by awe that this man can do no wrong; I’m blinded by awe because he can do no wrong. No fence sitting here: JG Thirlwell is the only artist I can name who has produced such a body…

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MELT-BANANA: FETCH

By Oliver Arditi

Noise, as the aural product of what is essentially a fine-grained stochastic process, calls into question the most widely shared notions of the meaningful musical utterance; or at least it does when presented or heard as music. Roughly speaking, the more noise there is in a performance or recording…

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BELIEVERS ROAST PRESENTS: THE EXQUISITE CORPSE GAME

By Oliver Arditi

The game of Consequences has a long history, probably in the order of two centuries, but quite possibly longer. Back when parlour games were essential lubricants to the passage of time, a progress not demarcated by the dazzling increments of the media age, such diversions had a far more prominent role…

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ALESSANDRO ‘SASEKO’ MOTOJIMA: SENDO SENSHI: ONE BLADE TO KILL THEM ALL (SOUNDTRACK)

By Oliver Arditi

Sendo Senshi is the title of an unreleased 1970s ‘whitexploitation’ movie, both directed and scored by Japanese-Italian Alessandro ‘Saseko’ Motojima. You can watch a trailer for it by clicking the link below; it promises violence, crime, gore, tits, shouting, sartorial intensity and all the garish, cartoonish traits of…

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SAM PHILLIPS: PUSH ANY BUTTON

By Steve Wilson

In the vast sea of women singer-songwriters bent on Joni worship and literary pretense, Sam Phillips stands, and always has stood out. Her palette is typically the same mix of acoustic and electric instruments shared with the confessional crowd, but her songwriting has always favored brevity, and a heady mix…

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THE WINGDALE COMMUNITY SINGERS: NIGHT, SLEEP, DEATH

By Christopher Nosnibor

Life’s complicated. I mean, insanely so. You go to the shop and have to figure out if the three for two-offer is actually a better deal than just buying the big catering pack. You’ve got to figure out on-line banking, how to work your new smart phone or table device, there’s the bus or train or drive to work to negotiate…

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GUAPO: HISTORY OF THE VISITATION

By Oliver Arditi

Guapo is a band with some form; since 1995 they have released a fistful of EPs and nine albums, and although the line-up and sound have changed considerably over that time, the name has been attached to music that shows a consistent and determined belief in the value of creative exploration.

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JOHN TOTTENHAM: ANTIEPITHALAMIA & OTHER POEMS OF REGRET AND RESENTMENT

By Edward S. Robinson

As the sparsely-texted rear cover of John Tottenham’s collection of poetry helpfully informs the reader, an epithalamium (n., pl -miums or -mia) is ‘a song or poem in honour of a bride and bridegroom.’ And so from the every outset, the collection’s theme is clear, and establishes itself in a position of antithesis.

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LOOP: REISSUES

By Jamie Sherry

Loop were formed in London in 1986 by Robert Hampson (vocals/guitars), and included an assortment of band members, before settling into the core and seminal line-up of Hampson, John Wills (drums), Neil MacKay (bass), and latterly Scott Dowson (guitar).

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IL SOGNO DEL MARINAIO: LA BUSTA GIALLA

By Michael Cano
Photos By Patsy Faragher

Andrea Belfi, the drummer, vocalist, pianist and glockenspielist for the musical trio that created this record of which I write a review explained the whole thing perfectly thusly: “Each song tells a story, the whole album has a narrative quality that is clearly perceivable from the very beginning.”

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CARLTON MELTON: PHOTOS OF PHOTOS

By Ben Young

I’m relieved to find that Carlton Melton evidently has nothing to do with Carnegie Mellon. Which reminds me of a time I played in a drum circle after crashing a party in someone’s mountain cabin and got stuck there during an ice storm. It was an intense, inclusive experience, peculiar to a certain age or innocence.

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SMOKE FAIRIES: BLOOD SPEAKS

By John Wigley

What do we want from music? That’s one big dumb and profoundly important/impotent question. Do we want it to comfort us, or challenge us on a deep level, a level that we didn’t know we had? Do we want the simple conformity of knowing what the music will be like just from a press photograph of the band…

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