DAVIS SCHNEIDERMAN: INK

By Edward S. Robinson

Ink is a concept novel. It contains exactly what the title promises. It’s perhaps fair to describe it not as a novel as such, as a visual art book. After all, even the most boundary-testing of novels, the likes of which eschew conventions such as linear narrative, plot and characterisation contain words or graphic representations…

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SUPERVERT: POST-DEPRAVITY

By Edward S. Robinson

We live in a post-everything world these days. In fact, we’re so post- many things, we’re probably post-post and are returning full-circle. Post-war… we’re slowly moving toward a different kind of war, not so much defined by the war on terror as the war on everything, a global war that pitches everyone against everything.

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STEWART HOME’S LIFE OF CRIME: BOXING, BULLSHITTERS, AND FABRICATED BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS

By Edward S. Robinson

Over the course of a career the length of which has doubtless surprised many, Stewart Home has adopted many styles and left an ever-extending trail of confusion in his wake. From his early parodies of pulp youthsploitation novels to the campus novel on drugs that was Mandy, Charlie and Mary-Jane

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TURNING THE WATER BLACK: CUTTING UP WITH GEOFFREY FARMER

By Edward S. Robinson

The exhibition catalogue to Geoffrey Farmer’s Let’s Make the Water Turn Black informs us that ‘echoing a 1968 composition by Frank Zappa of the same name… Let’s Make the Water Turn Black presents an improvised chronology of the six decades of the American musician’s life’ and that…

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DEATH IN PARIS: THE LAST (LIFTED) WORDS OF CARL WEISSNER

By Edward S. Robinson

On 24th January, 2012, I learned – via Facebook, where else? – of the death of Carl Weissner. The details were sketchy, and despite the fact I’d never met him, and had only had the briefest of email exchanges with him a year or two before, I couldn’t help but feel an immediate pang of loss.

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JOHN TOTTENHAM: ANTIEPITHALAMIA & OTHER POEMS OF REGRET AND RESENTMENT

By Edward S. Robinson

As the sparsely-texted rear cover of John Tottenham’s collection of poetry helpfully informs the reader, an epithalamium (n., pl -miums or -mia) is ‘a song or poem in honour of a bride and bridegroom.’ And so from the every outset, the collection’s theme is clear, and establishes itself in a position of antithesis.

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